Tesla is working on Sentry Mode for 360° dashcam surveillance says Elon

first_imgTesla is working to expand on its TeslaCam dashcam feature with a ‘Sentry Mode’ for 360° surveillance and it’s “coming soon”, according to Elon Musk. more…The post Tesla is working on ‘Sentry Mode’ for 360° dashcam surveillance, says Elon Musk appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Honda E Prototype Revealed ProductionBound Small Sporty EV

first_imgThe Honda E Prototype is a small, sporty EV with about 125 miles of range. A future version is expected to go into production later this year.At the Geneva Motor Show two years ago, Honda announced its “Electric Vision” plan for Europe. (Not the U.S.) The plan sets a target of 2025 for two-thirds of sales in Europe to be hybrid, EV, or fuel cell.More Honda EV News Honda Trademarks “Honda e” For Possible Electric Car Brand Honda Unveils Adorable Urban EV-Like Electric Concept Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 27, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News To demonstrate its progress on pure EVs, Honda next Tuesday will return to the Geneva Motor Show to unveil the Honda E Prototype. The company plans to enter production of the Honda E Prototype, or some variant, before the end of 2019. The Honda E Prototype is the next iteration of the 2017 Urban EV Concept – an ultra-cute, city runabout with a wide track, short overhangs, and suicide doors. The Urban EV is four inches shorter than a Honda Fit.As we outlined in our history of Honda EVs, the Japanese automaker has unveiled a long line of EV concepts for decades. But actual production has been limited. Honda sold a few hundred EV Pluses in the late 1990s and about a thousand Fit EVs from 2012 to 2014. It currently sells the 89-mile Clarity Electric in small numbers.While the Honda E Prototype could be just another concept to add to the list, there are signs that Honda is serious about putting a compelling new EV on European roads.Honda E PrototypeFirst, Honda has long held the stance that small, relatively short-range EVs are well suited to Europe. Way back in 2011, Takanobu Ito, Honda’s president, told me, “For Japan, Europe, and other parts of Asia, especially the urban areas, we think the smaller category would be an option. In this category, pure EVs would be appropriate.”Fair enough. We don’t favor small cars in the U.S., but they remain popular in Europe and Asia.And here’s another sign that the Japanese automaker is serious about a real EV based on the Honda E Prototype: The car will be built on a new, dedicated platform. Moreover, the platform uses a rear-wheel-drive system, suggesting an element of sportiness.Think of it as quick, fun, and funky commuter car – in the spirit of the BMW i3. The range is announced as 200 kilometers (or about 125 miles.) The Honda E Prototype has two doors but a small Honda EV was spotted in testing in late 2018 as a four-door model.Interior of Honda E PrototypeIt’s hard to know if the Honda E Prototype’s more futuristic elements are typical concept-car razzle-dazzle or real features. The list of cool items includes pop-out door handles, camera-based side mirrors, a see-through front fascia to show charging status, and a lounge-like cabin with a suite of monitors that extends nearly the entire length of the dashboard.We will be at the Geneva Motor Show to report on details following the unveiling on March 5. And we’ll ask what the new model could mean for potential Honda EVs in the United States. Honda Reveals First Glimpse Of Interior Of Urban EV Prototype Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

NIU receives US approval for its electric scooters 1000 already on the

first_imgSource: Charge Forward NIU, one of the leading international electric scooter companies, has finally received US certification for its scooters. The company will soon be adding the United States to a list of over two dozen countries carrying NIU’s electric mopeds and scooters. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe the podcast.https://youtu.be/a80dwn_R-mcThe post NIU receives US approval for its electric scooters; 1,000 already on the way appeared first on Electrek.last_img

BMW and Daimler strengthen autonomous partnership aim to bring tech to market

first_imgBMW and Daimler are strengthening their already-announced autonomous vehicle partnership as the two companies look to launch their next-generation self-driving tech in passenger cars by 2024. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post BMW and Daimler strengthen autonomous partnership, aim to bring tech to market by 2024 appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

Hillarys Corruption Perception Problem

first_imgImage a foreign country in which a political family amassed tens of millions of dollars to their family foundation during the same general time period in which one member of the family was a powerful official in various branches of government with some discretionary authority to advance the interest of donors. A political family in which one member was, at various points over the past decade, running for the nation’s highest elected office while at the same time securing millions of dollars in speaking fees from high-profile companies.An average American would rightly be concerned about the above activities and many would call the conduct of the political family corrupt, or at the very least raising a perception of corruption.Yet, as highlighted over the past several months, the above political family is not from a foreign country, but describes the Clintons, including presumptive Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton. As noted here: “what ought to frighten Americans is the way the Clintons mix money and power in the black box of their eponymous foundation to award themselves more of each.”The irony is that as Secretary of State Clinton championed the U.S. crusade against foreign bribery under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) stating that the Obama administration “has taken a strong stand when it comes to American companies bribing foreign officials” and that any perceived weakening of the FCPA “would not give us the leverage and the credibility that we are seeking” on the world stage.Yet recent revelations about the Clinton foundation and Hillary’s million-dollar speaking fees raise the question of why should business interaction with “foreign officials” be subject to different standards than business interaction with U.S. officials or political candidates? Why does the U.S. reflexively label a “foreign official” who receives “things of value” from private business interests as corrupt, yet generally turn a blind eye when it happens here at home?These questions, sparked by recent revelations about Hillary’s activities, speak volumes about the uncomfortable truths and double standards of U.S. bribery enforcement given that the FCPA and domestic bribery laws have similar elements. (See here for the article “The Uncomfortable Truths and Double Standards of Bribery Enforcement.”).Indeed, while Hillary was paid approximately $4.1 million in speaking fees by the financial industry, the same industry was the subject of FCPA scrutiny for alleged improper hiring practices involving the family members of foreign officials. In 2015, this scrutiny produced the first FCPA enforcement action, of what is expected to be several, as BNY Mellon agreed to pay Uncle Sam $25 million for allegedly offering paid and unpaid internships to the family members of foreign officials. (Never mind, as highlighted in the above-linked article, that Chelsea Clinton, like many children of powerful political families, has received lucrative jobs and other positions under circumstances that raise valid questions).At the very least, Hillary has a corruption perception problem and having her in the White House would, to use her prior words when speaking about foreign corruption, lower our standards and not give the U.S. the leverage and credibility that we need in the global fight against corruption.*****(Disclosure of interest: I was an intern in the Clinton White House)last_img read more

Superbugs emerging from skin bacteria on the increase

first_imgMethicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans. Image Credit: Tatiana Shepeleva / Shutterstock By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDSep 6 2018A new study has shown that some of the sub-strains of the bacteria that commonly live on our skin have become resistant to common infections – or in other words turned into superbugs. Infections with these strains thus could become untreatable with the antibiotics available and may turn life-threatening, warn researchers.According to a recent UK government report, emergence of the superbugs that are resistant to the commonly used antibiotics could push humans back into the “dark ages of medicine” where specific antibiotics were not available for all infections. This report says that if prompt action is not taken now, up to 10 million people could die of infections by these superbugs by 2050. In this latest study the team has looked at sub strains on the commonly present human pathogen called Staphylococcus aureus or staph. Staph has long since developed resistance to the bacteria Methicillin and has emerged as MRSA or Methicillin Resistant Staph aureus which has been notoriously difficult to treat. One of Staph’s sub-styrains commonly lives on the skin surface. This is called Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis). Staph epidermidis is fast emerging as a cause for hospital-acquired infections. It needs to be treated with an antibiotic called vancomycin. Vancomycin is commonly combined with another antibiotic called Rifampicin for the treatment of Staph epidermidis infections.In 2012 however a patient was admitted for a simple procedure and he acquired Staph epidermidis infection which necessitated a three month hospital stay. Dr. Jean Lee from the University of Melbourne’s Department of Microbiology and her colleagues and team including her PhD supervisor Professor Ben Howden started investigating this particular case of drug resistance. The team spent the next six years trying sequence the genetic code of this stain of the bacteria. They noted that Staph epidermidis has three distinct genetic lineages. These mutations were compared globally with other strains. One in 10 countries in the UK, America and Europe showed emergence of the same mutations that could lead to these superbugs that resisted the antibiotics. For this study the team collected hundreds of Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from 78 different medical institutions situated in 10 different countries worldwide.Related StoriesRaw meat can act as reservoir for bacteria associated with hospital infectionsCurved shape of bacteria can make it easier to find foodStructure of bacteria responsible for traveler’s diarrhea decipheredAccording to Lee, all of these three strains of the Staph epidermidis have spread worldwide and are resistant to the commonly used antibiotics. The 2012 case was not a one-off case, she adds. In fact some of the samples of the bacteria have shown that they are resistant to the strongest “last-ditch” antibiotics as well. This renders their infection potentially untreatable she explains. She added that this bacteria commonly is present over the skin and can enter into the body via the medical devices that are introduced within the body such as feeding tubes, catheters, intravenous lines etc.As of now the degree of prevalence of these strains around the world and their degree of severity of infection among patients is not explored in details, the authors explain. There is an emergence of a handful of reports that speak of Staph epidermidis resistance to antibiotics. Since these infections are commonly acquired within the intensive care when the patient’s immunity is low, the situation is more worrying. Professor Howden says, “Catheters and other implanted devices are frequently impregnated with antibiotics as a strategy to prevent infection, however this approach may be promoting the development of resistance. Also, these infections are most prevalent in intensive care, where patients are sickest and strong antibiotics are liberally prescribed, promoting the development of additional resistance.”At present a deeper understanding of the method of spread of this superbug and prevention of the same is being sought. Professor Howden says that there needs to be an “international monitoring system” that would provide data on prevalence of S. epidermidis and its impact. The system would also help measure antibiotic resistance and the infections caused by this strain he said.The research was published in the latest issue of the journal Nature Microbiology.Citation: Global spread of three multidrug-resistant lineages of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Jean Y. H. Lee, Ian R. Monk, Anders Gonçalves da Silva, Torsten Seemann, Kyra Y. L. Chua, Angela Kearns, Robert Hill, Neil Woodford, Mette D. Bartels, Birgit Strommenger, Frederic Laurent, Magali Dodémont, Ariane Deplano, Robin Patel, Anders R. Larsen, Tony M. Korman, Timothy P. Stinear & Benjamin P. Howden | Nature Microbiology (2018) https://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-018-0230-7last_img read more

Nuclear physicists may have just invented a zeroknowledge warhead inspection system

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Nuclear disarmament is all about trust—a hard thing for rival political powers to build, even under the best of circumstances. Today, a team of researchers revealed something that might make that process easier: a new technique that nuclear inspectors can use to verify whether a warhead is active, inactive, or a fake—all without learning anything about its design. “This is something that has been an open problem for 50 years,” says study author and Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge nuclear policy expert R. Scott Kemp, who adds that it may be “the first technical solution” to the problem.Nuclear powers still possess more than 15,000 such weapons, according to the Federation of American Scientists. Although agreements such as 2010’s New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty have sought to limit U.S. and Russian stockpiles of nuclear missiles, no system has been successfully implemented to verify whether a nuclear warhead has been dismantled without revealing design secrets. Previous methods that kept those secrets safe were all vulnerable to cheating, Kemp says.The new method—still theoretical—is a kind of physical encryption that allows warhead scanning without revealing too much. Inspectors would send a high-energy x-ray beam through a warhead in which some of the x-ray photons would be absorbed by nuclear materials. As in medical imaging, the pattern of x-rays that emerges can reveal the geometry of what’s inside the warhead. To scramble that information, the emerging beam is directed onto an “encryption foil”—a set of materials picked by the warhead’s owner and not revealed to the inspector. The x-ray photons hitting the foil cause it to emit gamma rays, via a process known as nuclear resonance fluorescence, which can then be picked up by a nearby detector.center_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The amount and frequencies of the gamma rays would provide a signature of the layout and composition of the warhead. But, because of encryption foil, that layout and composition would not be discernible to the inspectors. If the inspectors can first test a known active warhead and use it as a model, they would then be able to identify the status of any subsequently tested warheads with 99.9% accuracy, the researchers write today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Because the identity of the foil’s material will remain unknown to the inspectors, it would be impossible for them to use the detected radiation to infer the design of the warhead.Earlier methods to achieve such verification were still open to deception, the researchers say. Plasma physicist Robert Goldston of Princeton University, who helped develop one such system using high-energy neutrons, says he found Kemp’s system very interesting. He hopes that more work will be done to develop the technology to implement it successfully, perhaps in parallel with his neutron-imaging system. However, any real-world application of so-called “zero-knowledge” warhead verification remains decades away, Kemp says, thanks to—what else—diplomacy.last_img read more

Warming oceans are hurting seafood supply—and things are getting worse

first_img By Erik StokstadFeb. 28, 2019 , 2:00 PM Despite these well-known problems, no one had looked at the impact that climate change has had so far on fisheries around the world. Chris Free, a fisheries scientist, dove into the topic for his dissertation at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. He created a computer model of the way fish populations respond to temperature, relying on a large database of scientific assessments, conducted between 1930 and 2010, of stocks that represent roughly a third of the fish caught around the world. Free, now a postdoc at the University of California, Santa Barbara, looked for patterns of how these stocks had responded to changes in sea surface temperature.Managing a stock of fish, in simple terms, is like withdrawing cash from a bank account that earns interest. Each year, a certain amount can be caught by fishing boats without depleting the stock—that portion is known as the maximum sustainable yield. A more productive fishery—where water temperature is optimal and food plentiful, for example—is like a bank account with a higher interest rate, which means more fish can be sustainably caught.So what has climate change done to sustainable fishing? Out of 235 stocks, Free and his colleagues found a few winners. Nine stocks had become on average 4% more productive. These stocks are in places where rising temperatures have made too-cold water more suitable for fish, such as far north and south of the equator. Off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador in Canada, for example, the maximum sustainable yield has increased by 14% since 1930. And fishing there could get even better. According to the new research, the productivity of Greenland halibut will increase 51% with each degree Celsius of warming. That’s like getting a big, fat boost to the interest rate on your saving account.This local good news is outweighed by 19 stocks elsewhere that are on average 8% less productive than before. Many of these are around northern Europe and Japan, and they will likely continue to decline as their environment continues to heat up. Boats chasing Atlantic cod in the Irish Sea face a particularly grim future: The maximum sustainable yield of this stock will shrink by 54% for each additional degree of warming, the team reports today in Science.Combining winners and losers, the overall maximum sustainable yield of the 235 stocks is now 4% lower than in 1930. That’s about 1.4 million fewer tons of fish than could be sustainably caught previously. “At first glance, it feels like a small number,” Free says, “but it’s a big deal for the lives of people who depend on them.”The figure is probably an underestimate because there are few data from the tropics. Fish in the tropics already live in warm water, so they have likely suffered more from recent temperature rises than have fish in the temperate zone. “Fish there are already with their back to the wall with respect to temperature,” Froese says. “We expect the tropics to be hardest hit.”The findings are “an important advance,” Éva Plagányi of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) in Canberra writes in an accompanying commentary in Science. The study, she adds, offers “a solid foundation” for predicting how rising temperature will impact particular stocks in particular places.The overall decline will most likely steepen, as forecasts have previously suggested. Since 1930, average sea surface temperatures have risen by about 0.5°C. By the end of this century, more than three times that amount of warming will likely happen, and marine heat waves will become more frequent. Although temperatures will become more favorable to fish in higher latitude waters, “those benefits can’t last forever,” Free says. “There probably is a tipping point.”Fishery managers can help the situation. The analysis suggests stocks are harder hit by rising temperature if they have been heavily overfished. That is surprising, Froese says, because fishing tends to selectively remove larger fish and heavily fished stocks evolve to be smaller and mature faster. These smaller fish, which are more efficient at using oxygen, might, in theory, be better able to cope with warmer water that has less oxygen. But the new study suggests these stocks were less resilient to temperature increases.One reason could be that excess fishing wiped out the genes for coping with warmer temperatures, Froese says. Whatever the mechanism, fisheries scientists know that curbing overfishing leads to larger and more sustainable harvests. “Reducing overfishing,” he says, “is a no-brainer.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Warming oceans are hurting seafood supply—and things are getting worse Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Cod in the North Sea have suffered from rising temperatures, as well as overfishing. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Marine fish around the world are already feeling the effects of climate change—and some are reeling, according to the first large analysis of recent trends. Rising sea temperatures have reduced the productivity of some fisheries by 15% to 35% over 8 decades, although in other places fish are thriving because warming waters are becoming more suitable. The net effect is that the world’s oceans can’t yield as much sustainable seafood as before, a situation that is likely to worsen as global warming accelerates in the oceans.A silver lining is that the research suggests well-managed fisheries are more resilient in the face of rising temperature, says Rainer Froese, a marine ecologist with the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany, who was not involved in the work. “We have to stop overfishing to let the gene pool survive, so that [the fish] can adapt to climate change,” he says. “We have to give them a break.”As cold-blooded animals, fish mirror the temperature of the water they swim in. When the water gets too warm, the enzymes they use for digestion and other functions are less efficient, impairing growth and reproduction. In addition, warm water contains less oxygen, a further stressor. PA Images/Alamy Stock Photo last_img read more

Artificial intelligence learns teamwork in a deadly game of capture the flag

first_img Email DeepMind Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Human gamers know just how hard it is to win a new spin on the classic computer game Quake: In a mazelike arena, they must work with other players to capture floating flags—all while dodging deadly gunfire. Now, for the first time, artificial intelligence (AI) has mastered teamwork in a complex first-person video game, coordinating its actions with both human and computer teammates to consistently beat opponents.“The scale of the experiments is remarkable,” says Michael Littman, an AI expert at Brown University. Getting AI agents to work together is incredibly tough, he says.Although AI can drive cars and easily defeat the world’s greatest chess and Go players one on one, researchers have struggled to get it to master teamwork. The practice may seem intuitive to us, but predicting how others will behave—a crucial component of working on a team—adds a whole new level of complexity and uncertainty for AI to deal with. In the new study, researchers got AI bots to teach each other to work as a team. Their classroom was a simplified version of 1999 first-person shooter, Quake III Arena. The game involves two teams that navigate around a 3D map to retrieve a flag from their opponent’s base and return it to theirs. The team with the most captures after 5 minutes wins. Players also fire a laser to tag enemies, sending them back to their home base.To train the AI to work as a team, the scientists created 30 different bots and pitted them against each other in a series of matches on randomly generated maps. The bots trained using brain-inspired algorithms called neural networks, which learn from data by altering the strength of connections between artificial neurons. The only data the bots had to learn from was the first-person visual perspective of their character and game points, awarded for things like picking up flags or tagging opponents. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country DeepMind’s bots work in pairs to capture the opposing team’s flag on indoor and outdoor maps in Quake III Arena. Initially the bots acted randomly. But when their actions scored points, the connections that led to the behavior were strengthened through a process called reinforcement learning. The training program also culled the bots that tended to lose and replaced them with mutated copies of top performers inspired by the way genetic variation and natural selection help animals evolve.After 450,000 games, the researchers arrived at the best bot, which they named For The Win (FTW). They then tested it in various matches with a mirror FTW, an FTW bot missing a crucial learning element, the game’s in-built bots, and humans. Teams of FTW bots consistently outperformed all other groups, though humans paired with FTW bots were able to beat them 5% of the time, they report today in Science.The FTW bots learned to play seamlessly with humans and machines, and they even developed classic cooperative strategies, says study co-leader Max Jaderberg, an AI researcher at Google-owned DeepMind in London. Those strategies included following teammates in order to outnumber opponents in later firefights and loitering near the enemy base when their teammate has the flag to immediately grab it when it reappears. In one test, the bots invented a completely novel strategy, exploiting a bug that let teammates give each other a speed boost by shooting them in the back.“What was amazing during the development of this project was seeing the emergence of some of these high-level behaviors,” Jaderberg says. “These are things we can relate to as human players.”The approach is still a long way from working in the real world, Jaderberg adds. But the advance is good for more than computer games. If AI can learn to work in teams, it could make everything from self-driving cars that avoid crashes by coordinating with each other to robotic surgical assistants that help out doctors during procedures.Still, Littman warns against extrapolating too much from a relatively simple computer simulation. “It could be that the details of this particular game require only a very narrow slice of what we think of as teamwork,” he says. And that, he says, means there’s no guarantee the same approach would teach AI to work as a team on other tasks. Artificial intelligence learns teamwork in a deadly game of capture the flag By Edd GentMay. 30, 2019 , 2:00 PMlast_img read more

A tailormade drug developed in record time may save girl from fatal

first_img A tailormade drug developed in record time may save girl from fatal brain disease Julie Afflerbaugh For years, a Colorado couple searched for an explanation for why their bright, active little girl was having increasing trouble walking, speaking, and seeing. In December 2016, Julia Vitarello and Alek Makovec learned that 6-year-old Mila Makovec almost certainly had Batten disease, an inherited and fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Now, in a stunning illustration of personalized genomic medicine, Mila is receiving a drug tailored to her particular disease-causing DNA mutation—and it appears to have halted the condition’s progression.Today at the annual meeting of The American Society of Human Genetics in San Diego, California, researchers told the story of how in less than a year, they went from sequencing Mila’s genome to giving her a synthetic RNA molecule that helps her cells ignore her genetic flaw and make a needed protein. The same steps could help some other patients with diseases caused by unique mutations in a single gene, they said.“It’s very exciting,” says gene therapy researcher Steven Gray of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, who wasn’t involved in the research. “There couldn’t be a stronger example of how personalized medicine might work in practice.” By Jocelyn KaiserOct. 19, 2018 , 9:00 PM A custommade drug appears to be helping Mila, a 7-year-old born with Batten disease. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Batten disease afflicts an estimated two to four in 100,000 births in the United States. Patients have problems with lysosomes, enzyme-filled sacs within cells that clear waste molecules. Without properly working lysosomes, waste builds up and kills neural cells, causing brain damage and death by adolescence.When Mila’s doctors in Colorado sequenced the protein-coding part of her genome, they found an error in one copy of a gene called CLN7, which codes for a protein that likely helps move molecules across the membrane of lysosomes. Both copies—one from mom, one from dad—of CLN7 need to be mutated to cause the disease, yet only the one from Mila’s father appeared defective.Mila’s physicians wanted to take a closer look at her entire genome to confirm that she had the CLN7 form of Batten. But few clinical labs were offering this more expensive analysis. Plus, the time frame to complete such work was at least 4 months, during which Mila’s condition would continue to decline.Then, one night in January 2017, Cindy Lien, a physician at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, was on a Facebook group for physician moms when she saw a note that moved her: A friend of Mila’s family posted that Mila needed whole genome sequencing—fast. Lien told her husband, Timothy Yu, a neurologist and neurogeneticist at the Harvard University–affiliated Boston Children’s Hospital whose work involves sequencing autism patients’ genomes. “Let’s help,” he recalls saying.A month later, Yu’s lab had generated Mila’s whole genome results. Nothing new popped out from a standard analysis. But looking on a computer screen at Mila’s full genome sequence, Yu’s team noticed that a section within the noncoding portion of her mother’s CLN7 gene didn’t line up properly with the normal sequence for the CLN7 gene. By April, tests showed that a roughly 2000-letter stretch of DNA had landed there—a short sequence of DNA known as a retrotransposon that can jump around genomes. This extra DNA caused an error when the CLN7 gene was transcribed into RNA, the instructions for the cell’s proteinmaking machinery. As a result, that copy of Mila’s CLN7 gene was producing a shortened and useless lysosomal protein.Yu decided to try a new type of drug called an antisense oligonucleotide. It can bind to defective RNA, hiding it and tricking cells into producing a normal protein. He found a company that could quickly manufacture an antisense oligonucleotide his team had designed that matched Mila’s CLN7 mutation and worked in her cells. By December 2017, Yu’s team had the drug in hand—dubbed “milasen” for their young patient.In January, with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval for a one-patient trial, “We took a deep breath and started” treatment, Yu recalls. His team infused a low dose of milasen into Mila’s spinal fluid, where it would ideally make its way to her brain and fix her neurons, then raised the dose every 2 weeks.The drug appears to be safe. And although Yu’s team doesn’t yet have biochemical evidence that Mila’s neural cells are making the CLN7 gene’s protein, some of her Batten symptoms have gradually abated. The clearest change is that she now has fewer and milder seizures, Yu reports. They once came 20 to 30 times a day and lasted up to 2 minutes. Now, that is down to five to 12 daily, lasting just a few seconds, Yu says.Mila, now back home in Colorado, is still blind, can’t speak, and needs help walking. But, “She looks stable” in clinical tests, Yu says. Her mom has noticed that Mila has gained leg and torso strength, can swallow better, and seems more alert—small changes that “are huge for me,” she says. She calls it “unbelievable” that Mila now “might actually have a second chance at life.”Yu could not say how much it cost to develop the treatment, which Mila will continue to receive every 3 months. But it was covered with a combination of fundraising through her family’s Mila’s Miracle Foundation, Yu’s research support, and Boston Children’s Hospital.Yu estimates that up to 10% to 15% of patients with Batten and other genetic diseases have similar rare mutations involving a misread gene that, once identified, could be targeted quickly with custommade antisense drugs. His team is now working on using the same strategy to treat certain cases of other inherited neurodegenerative disorders, he says. “I think this really does open up a path that could be applied to other genetic diseases.”*Update, 21 October, 10:15 a.m.: This story has been updated to explain how DNA and RNA are connected. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Ben Carsons Latest Hire Used The NWord

first_img Ben Carson , Eric Blankenstein , Housing , HUD The Washington Post also says he wrote the majority of hate crimes were hoaxes and “that a proposal at the University of Virginia to impose harsher academic penalties for acts of intolerance was ‘racial idiocy.’”The blog posts were 15 years ago but it doesn’t seem like much has changed if he part of the Trump administration. And Blankenstein’s new role at HUD? He will be HUD’s Office of General Counsel.Back in September, Blankenstein said about his posts, “The need to dig up statements I wrote as a 25 year old shows that in the eyes of my critics I am not guilty of a legal infraction or neglect of my duties, but rather just governing while conservative.”According to Politico, Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) slammed HUD, saying in a statement, “The Department of Housing should be working to address housing discrimination across the country, not serving as a dumping ground for a disgraced, racist Trump appointee.”This isn’t a shocker from Carson. This is the same man who wants to kick out 55,000 American children from public housing. Earlier this month, ABC News asked about how he is enforcing a law to kick families out of public housing if one person lives in their home illegally, “Because it’s the law. We’re a nation of laws and if the lawmakers don’t like it, they need to change it.”However, Carson selectively uses the excuse of the law.According to Politico, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) has determined Carson broke the law by buying a $31,000 dining room set for his office and $8,000 dishwasher in the office kitchen. “Agencies are required to notify Congress of expenditures over $5,000 to furnish an executive’s office,” Politico wrote last month. A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ USA, New York, Protesters of police killing march in New York demanding Justice For All 31 Black Women Who Died In Police Custody Ben Carson‘s surrounds himself with racists. As the only African-American in Trump’s cabinet racists appear to be who he is most comfortable with and his latest hire at Housing and Urban Development proves just that.SEE ALSO: Maleah Davis’ Mother Confirms Her Husband Talked About Murder And Dumping A BodyEric Blankenstein is Carson’s latest hire who just resigned from a policy director at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in May, six months after racist blog posts surfaced. According to The Washington Post back in September, Blankenstein wrote a white person using the n-word doesn’t mean they are racist, “Fine…let’s say they called him n[—-]…would that make them racists, or just assholes looking for the most convenient way to get under his skin?”center_img More By NewsOne Staff Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Congress was reportedly not notified and Carson allegedly canceled the dining room set when the story broke early last year. No word about the dishwasher.We’ll see what other laws they will break with Eric Blankenstein.SEE ALSO:One Step Forward, 10 Steps Back: San Francisco’s First Black Woman Mayor Unseated By Rich White ManOutrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

Holbrook council deadlocks in effort to select vice mayor

first_imgJune 18, 2018 By Toni Gibbons The Holbrook City Council attempted to elect a new vice mayor from their membership, but ended in a deadlock that required a call to the city’s attorney, Marlene Pontrelli, to weigh inSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Holbrook council deadlocks in effort to select vice mayorlast_img

Himalayan glaciers are melting twice as fast as last century study

first_img Himalayan glaciers are melting twice as fast as last century: study The Himalayas, part of an area that is referred to as “The Third Pole” because it has so much ice, has only 72% of the ice that was there in 1975.Cold War era spy satellite images are showing scientists that glaciers on the Himalayas are now melting about twice as fast as they used to. The Asian mountain range, which includes Mount Everest, has been losing ice at a rate of about 1% a year since 2000, according to a study Wednesday in the journal Science Advances .“The amount of ice (lost) is scary but what is much more scary is the doubling of the melt rate,” said Josh Maurer, a glacier researcher at Columbia University’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory and lead author of the study.The Himalayas, part of an area that is referred to as “The Third Pole” because it has so much ice, has only 72% of the ice that was there in 1975. It has been losing about 8.3 billion tons (7.5 billion metric tons) of ice a year, compared 4.3 billion tons (3.9 billion metric tons) a year between 1975 and 2000, according to the study. The Himalayan melt doesn’t contribute much to sea level rise, Mauer said, because it is dwarfed by melting in Greenland and Antarctica. But the loss of the ice means current and future disruptions of water supplies _ both surges and shortages _ for the hundreds of millions of people in the region who rely on it for hydropower, agriculture, and drinking, said study co-author Jorg Schaefer, a climate geochemistry professor at Columbia.“Disaster is in the making here,” Schaefer said.Scientists lacked some critical data on ice in the Himalayas until Maurer found once-classified 3D images from U.S. spy satellites that had been put online. Those images allowed Maurer to calculate how much ice was on the Himalayas in 1975. He then used other satellite data to measure ice in 2000 and then again in 2016.Past research looked at individual Himalayan glaciers over short time periods, but this is the first to look at the big picture _ 650 glaciers over decades, Schaefer said.For years, scientists have looked at many possible causes for melting glaciers, including pollution and changes in rainfall. But when the team was able to see trends using long-term data, they found the major culprit: “it’s clear it’s temperature and everything else doesn’t matter as much,” Schaefer said. Maurer double-checked that conclusion by feeding the data into a computer model. It “predicted” the same type of ice melt that happened over the four decades.NASA climate scientist Josh Willis, who wasn’t part of the study, said it provided important confirmation of what scientists suspected and what models showed.“As a scientist it’s nice to hear that we’re right, but then again as a civilian it’s sometimes a little scary to hear that we’re right,” Willis said. Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach By AP |Washington | Published: June 20, 2019 8:05:50 am A warlord who eats humans to fabulous creatures: The many tales from the Himalayas Best Of Express Advertisingcenter_img Strong winds delay retrieval of climbers’ bodies in India 1 Comment(s) Related News After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising You Are Here last_img read more

Sonipat boy fakes abduction demands Rs 5 crore from dad

first_img Haryana: Sacked employee among three held for murder of doctor in Karnal sonipat police, haryana police, fake death, boy fakes death, boy fakes death for money, india news, Indian Express The youth, identified as Ujjawal, was arrested with a teenager friend from a Gurgaon hotel. (Representational Image)Haryana Police Saturday arrested a Sonipat youth for faking his own abduction and demanding Rs 5 crore from his father. The youth, identified as Ujjawal, was arrested with a teenager friend from a Gurgaon hotel, hours after former’s father informed the police that his son has been abducted.“Ujjawal, a resident of Akbarpur Barota in Sonipat, had changed the number plate of his car and checked into a hotel in Sector-15, Gurgaon,” a police spokesperson said.“Ujjawal’s father, Mukesh Kumar, lodged a complaint with Sonipat police that he had received a voice message on his mobile from his son’s phone in which a person claimed that Ujjawal was abducted, and demanded a ransom of Rs 5 crore for his safe release. Gurgaon man stabs wife, two children to death, hangs himself, leaves note behind The caller also threatened to kill Ujjawal if ransom was not paid. Mukesh informed us that Ujjawal had earlier in day left for Sonipat court in a Mahindra XUV car,” the spokesman added.Acting on the information, Inspector General (Rohtak range) Sandeep Khirwar, and Superintendent of Police, Sonipat, Pratiksha Godara constituted nine teams.Tracking the tower location of the mobile phone used in the act, police teams reached the Gurgaon hotel where Ujjawal and his minor friend were staying. During preliminary interrogation, Ujjawal confessed that he had faked his abduction with the help of his friend. Advertising As Gurgaon resident drove traveler, his ‘Aadhaar’ bailed out accused in 16 cases Related News By Express News Service |Chandigarh | Published: July 14, 2019 8:25:40 am Advertising Post Comment(s)last_img read more

Greek Conservatives take charge in landslide win vow more investment fewer taxes

first_img Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Greece, Greece election, Greece election result, Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Kyriakos Mitsotakis Greece, Greece Kyriakos Mitsotakis, Greece Prime Minister, Greece election news, World news, Indian Express, latest news New Democracy conservative party leader Kyriakos Mitsotakis speaks outside party’s headquarters, after the general election in Athens, Greece, July 7, 2019. (Reuters)Greece’s opposition conservatives returned to power with a landslide victory in snap elections on Sunday, and Prime Minister-elect Kyriakos Mitsotakis said he had a clear mandate for change, pledging more investments and fewer taxes. By Reuters |Athens | Updated: July 8, 2019 9:24:14 am Advertising Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence People celebrate outside New Democracy conservative party’s headquarters, after the general election in Athens, Greece, July 7, 2019. (Reuters)Tsipras took over from the conservatives in 2015 as Greece was at the peak of a financial crisis which had ravaged the country since 2010. Initially vowing to resist deeper austerity, he was forced into signing up to another bailout months after his election, a decision which went down badly with voters.The handover will take place on Monday, after Mitsotakis’s swearing-in as new Prime Minister.Sunday’s poll was the first national election since the country shook off close scrutiny by its European partners who loaned Greece billions in three bailouts.Tsipras signed up to the latest, in 2015, in return for debt relief. After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan In one neighbourhood, activists stormed a polling station and made off with a ballot box. Best Of Express Advertising The win appeared driven by fatigue with years of European Union-enforced belt-tightening, combined with high unemployment, after the country almost crashed out of the euro zone at the height of its financial travails in 2015.Conservative New Democracy had a commanding lead of 39.6 percent of the vote based on 73 percent of the votes counted versus 31.6 percent for incumbent leftist Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’ Syriza, the official interior ministry tally showed.Exit polls showed New Democracy winning between 155 and 167 seats in the 300 member parliament, taking advantage of an electoral system which gives bonus seats to the frontrunner. Greek opposition New Democracy conservative party leader Kyriakos Mitsotakis, left, talks to his supporters after win the parliamentary elections at the New Democracy headquarters in Athens, on Sunday, July 7, 2019. (AP)Mitsotakis said in a televised address that the election outcome gave him a strong and clear mandate to change Greece.“I am committed to fewer taxes, many investments, for good and new jobs, and growth which will bring better salaries and higher pensions in an efficient state,” Mitsotakis said.Tsipras said he respected the will of the Greek people.“Today, with our head held high we accept the people’s verdict. To bring Greece to where it is today we had to take difficult decisions (with) a heavy political cost,” he told journalists. Advertising Top News Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence More Explained After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Mitsotakis, 51, assumed the helm of New Democracy in 2016. Although he is regarded as a liberal, his party also harbours members with more right-wing views.Golden Dawn, an extreme right-wing party detractors accuse of having neo-Nazi sympathies, lost significant ground with early results suggesting it may not reach the 3 per cent threshold to parliament.SNAP ELECTION“The basic reason (for the result) is the economy,” said analyst Theodore Couloumbis. “In the past 4.5 years people saw no improvement, on the contrary there were cutbacks in salaries and pensions,” he said.The focus now turns to Mitsotakis’s picks for the key economics ministries – finance, energy, development and foreign affairs. He has been tight-lipped on choices during the campaign.Mitsotakis will inherit an economy that is growing at a moderate clip – at a 1.3% annual pace in the first quarter – and public finances that may fall short of targets agreed with official lenders.The Bank of Greece projects that 3.5% of GDP primary surplus target that excludes debt servicing outlays is likely to be missed this year and reach just 2.9% of economic output.With Greece still challenged by its debt overhang, the fiscal policy stance of the new government will be closely watched.The real test will be next year’s budget with Mitsotakiss expected to outline the key contours in the traditional economic address in Thessaloniki in September.“I want the government that will be elected to do its best for the people, who are hungry,” said pensioner Christos Mpekos, 69. “To give jobs to the young so they don’t leave.”Tsipras says that a vote cast for Mitsotakis would go to the political establishment, which forced Greece to the edge of the precipice in the first place.But he has also been roundly criticised for mismanagement of crises and for brokering a deeply unpopular deal to end a dispute over the name of neighbouring North Macedonia.Greece wrapped up its last economic adjustment programme in 2018 but remains under surveillance from lenders to ensure no future fiscal slippage. While economic growth has returned, Greek unemployment of 18 per cent is the euro zone’s highest.New Democracy has promised to invest in creating well-paid jobs with decent benefits. It has also promised to be tough on crime in some neighbourhoods of Athens where there is a strong anti-establishment movement. Post Comment(s) Taking stock of monsoon rain Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield last_img read more

New antiHER2 drug shows promising antitumor activity in gullet stomach and bowel

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 14 2018An antibody that binds simultaneously to two distinct regions of the HER2 receptor to block the growth of cancer cells has shown promising signs of anti-tumor activity in a number of cancers including those of the gullet (esophagus), stomach and bowel.Results from the phase I clinical trial of the drug, called ZW25, had been presented earlier this year , but updated results, focusing on patients with esophageal, stomach, bowel and several other cancers driven by HER2, were presented today (Wednesday) at the 30th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Dublin, Ireland.HER2, a member of the human epidermal growth factor receptor family, is best known for the role it plays in breast cancer. Trastuzumab (Herceptin) is an effective treatment for HER2‑positive breast cancers. Stomach cancers that are driven by HER2 also respond well to trastuzumab, but if cancer returns in these patients, there are no further approved HER2‑targeted agents. Unfortunately, for patients with other HER2‑driven cancers, there are currently no approved HER2‑targeted agents.Dr Murali Beeram, a medical oncologist and clinical investigator at the START Center for Cancer Care, San Antonio, USA, told the Symposium that as of 16 October a total of 24 patients, who had received several previous therapies (an average of four) but whose cancers had returned, have been given between one and ten cycles of ZW25 since joining the phase I trial, which started in September 2016 (either 10 mg/kg weekly or 20 mg/kg every other week). All had HER2 positive cancers, including cancers of the oesophagus and stomach (gastroesophageal) (10 patients), bowel (5), gall bladder (3), bile duct (1), cervix (1), endometrial (1) fallopian tube (1), skin (adnexal) (1), and parotid gland (1), and eight of these patients remain in the trial.The latest results in 17 patients with responses available for evaluation show that 13 experienced shrinkage of their tumor. The median time the patients survived without their disease progressing was 6.21 months. Side effects have been mostly mild or moderate with the most common being diarrhea or a reaction to the infusion of the drug.Dr Beeram said: “As a clinician, I am excited by the single agent anti-tumor activity and tolerability we are seeing with ZW25, particularly in these patents with advanced HER2‑expressing cancers that have progressed after multiple prior therapies, including HER2‑targeted agents.In fact, trastuzumab is the only HER2‑targeted therapy approved for gastric cancer and there are no approved HER2-targeted therapies for other types of cancer that are driven by the HER2 receptor. ZW25 has been well tolerated to date, which should allow it to be used in combination with other agents for potentially even better responses.”Related StoriesScientists use advanced imaging to track brain tumor ‘turncoats’Researchers identify potential drug target for multiple cancer typesWomen more likely to suffer from long-term cognitive impairment after brain tumor radiationZW25 is an antibody that can simultaneously bind two distinct regions of the HER2 receptor, a protein that promotes the growth of cancer cells. Dr Beeram explained: “This unique design results in multiple mechanisms of action, including dual HER2 signal blockade, increased binding, and removal of HER2 protein from the cancer cell surface; it also stimulates the immune system to attack the cancer cells. This has led to encouraging anti-tumor activity in patients whose tumors have stopped responding to approved therapies, and who are in desperate need of new medicines that provide anti-tumor activity without excessive toxic side effects. The impressive activity of ZW25, combined with its tolerability, is notable and should be investigated further.”In addition to the cancers already mentioned, a number of others also are driven by the HER2 protein; they include cancers of the womb, ovaries, lung and bladder. Zymeworks, the company that developed ZW25, has expanded the study and a phase II/III study for patients with oesophageal, stomach, and other cancers is planned for next year. In addition, studies are planned to investigate ZW25 in combination with other anti-cancer drugs in patients with cancers that have an overabundance of HER2 receptors and copies of the HER2 gene, and also in those with fewer HER2 receptors and gene copies.Co-chair of the EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium, Professor Antoni Ribas from the University of California Los Angeles, who was not involved in the research, commented: “Although these are early results on a small number of patients, they suggest that this new HER2 targeted antibody can have an effect on difficult-to-treat cancers that have either failed to respond to previous therapies or have recurred. We look forward to further results from this study, as well as the further studies that are planned.” Source:https://www.ecco-org.eu/last_img read more

Researchers successfully restore sense of vision in blind people using BVTs bionic

first_imgWe have completed surgeries on four patients to implant the device and the team is very pleased with their progress. All four patients have had a sense of sight restored and are in the process of learning how to use the bionic eye for mobility and other activities.”Each of the patients has returned home after surgery and are working with the clinical and research team to learn to use the device and incorporate it into their everyday lives.We believe the Australian bionic eye being tested has advantages over international competitors, including a superior surgical approach, stability of the device and unique vision processing software that aims to improve the patient’s experience.At the moment, we are focused on patients who have vision loss due to Retinitis Pigmentosa, an inherited genetic condition.Based on our results so far, we know that our approach is safer and less invasive, and the patients have all made impressive progress with mobility and activities of daily living,”Assoc Prof Penny Allen, of the Centre for Eye Research Australia and head of the Vitreoretinal Unit at The Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital Nov 22 2018Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Bionic Vision Technologies Pty Ltd (BVT) today announced medical researchers had successfully restored a sense of vision in four blind people with its bionic eye as part of a clinical trial in Melbourne.Researchers said they were “very pleased” with the progress of all four patients who have had a “sense of sight” restored. All four have a degenerative genetic condition called Retinitis Pigmentosa which causes loss of vision.Principal investigator Associate Professor Penny Allen made the announcement to the annual Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists Scientific meeting in Adelaide.An earlier study of three patients established the safety of a prototype but restricted use to the lab. The new study uses a permanent device that can be used every day.   Related StoriesEye research charity funds development of ‘organ-on-a-chip’ to fight glaucomaProtein found in the eye can protect against diabetic retinopathyExercises and swimming goggles may reduce adverse effects on eye during long spaceflightsRetinitis Pigmentosa is a debilitating genetic disorder that leads to loss of vision. It affects about one in every 4,000 people, affecting 1.5 million people worldwide. It is the leading cause of inherited blindness. There is currently no cure.How the Bionic Vision Technologies (BVT) Pty Ltd bionic eye works The BVT developed bionic eye consists of implanted and body worn components. The patient wears glasses with a small video camera mounted on the side. The live feed from the camera is processed and transmitted via an implanted microchip to an electrode array placed in a naturally occurring pocket behind the retina, called the suprachoroidal space. The electrodes stimulate remaining cells in the retina, to generate spots of light that give a patient a sense of vision. We welcome developments like this which potentially provide support and independence to the many people and families affected by this genetic condition. The ability to regain a sense of sight will make a positive difference to the lives of people diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa.”Chairman of Retina Australia, Leighton Boyd Source:http://bionicvis.com/last_img read more

Lack of job and poor housing conditions increased likelihood of people attending

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 18 2019A survey of 20 disadvantaged neighborhoods across the North West (UK) has revealed the social influences on why people attend their local Accident & Emergency department.Researchers from the University of Liverpool, supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), conducted a household health survey including over 3,500 face-to-face interviews with households randomly selected in communities across Lancashire, Cheshire and Merseyside.31% of survey respondents had attended A&E in the previous 12 months with individual attendance rates ranging between 1 and 95 visits. Age was a big factor in potential visits, with 18-26 year olds three times more likely to attend A&E compared to those above 64 years of ageOther outputs from the research, published in the online journal BMJ Open, suggested a lack of a job increased the likelihood of A&E attendance by 38% and poor housing conditions increased attendance by 34%.Related StoriesTAU’s new Translational Medical Research Center acquires MILabs’ VECTor PET/SPECT/CTResearch on cannabis use in women limited, finds new studyOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchParticipants were asked to complete general background about their physical health, mental health, lifestyle, social issues, housing, environment, finances and local health service usage. Households were approached at different times during the day to ensure a mix of sample participants.Depression, a need for help with personal care, access to public transport and household proximity to A&E departments were other key factors found to influence an individual’s decision on whether to attend. Those living closer to an A&E department also formed a higher proportion of attendees while the distance from their local GP surgery could also influence a decision to attend.Dr Clarissa Giebel, a Research Manager at the University of Liverpool, said: “This is one of the first surveys to explore a comprehensive set of socio-economic factors, as well as proximity to both GP and A&E services, as predictors of A&E attendance in disadvantaged areas”A&E attendance rates are rapidly on the increase and are particularly high in disadvantaged areas.”In order to reduce A&E attendances we need to consider wider factors communities are facing. Inequalities around employment and housing are an important part of understanding the motivations for attendance levels and there is a clear need for closer consideration of the placement of primary care services and ensuring clearer public access routes to them.”The research also identified that higher levels of education were associated with an increased likelihood of A&E attendance and having more than one illness did not automatically mean people would be more likely to attend A&E, when compared to someone with a single condition.Source: https://news.liverpool.ac.uk/2019/01/17/new-survey-identifies-the-social-influences-in-people-attending-ae/last_img read more

UV disinfection technology eliminates up to 977 of pathogens in operating rooms

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 18 2019Using ultraviolet (UV) disinfection technology to reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections eliminated up to 97.7 percent of pathogens in operating rooms (ORs), according to a study published in the American Journal of Infection Control.The study examined a UV light technology platform deployed by New York-based PurpleSun that can be used for a range of disinfection applications for ORs, patient rooms and other health care settings. Unlike other disinfecting tools, which includes chemicals that can take minutes to inactivate pathogens and at times can leave bacteria on surfaces due to human and product error, PurpleSun reaches multiple surfaces in seconds with UV light. The study found that it all but eliminates human and product error in the proliferation pathogens that can contribute to the spread of pathogens that contribute to infection.Related StoriesBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryHave cancer, must travel: Patients left in lurch after hospital closesIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyPurpleSun’s focused multivactor ultraviolet (FMUV) device can be deployed to surround equipment on all sides, with foldable partitions whose light hits five different surface points and uses higher levels of UV intensity in 90-second intervals. More than 3,000.microbiological samples following 100 different surgical cases were taken in and around the ORs at three different hospitals in the New York metropolitan area. The observational study is believed to be the first to use five-point multisided sampling in testing the effect of UV disinfection technology.”Ultraviolet light technology will not replace manual cleaning and disinfection with chemicals, but it is has a place in health care settings. This technology can optimize environmental cleanliness, resulting in decreased pathogens that could potentially cause infection,” said Donna Armellino, RN, DNP, vice president of infection prevention at Northwell Health and lead author of the study, called: “Assessment of focused multivector ultraviolet disinfection with shadowless delivery, using five-point multisided sampling of patient care equipment without manual-chemical disinfection.”Dr. Armellino says the intent of the study was to determine if UV technology reduces environmental pathogens for the purpose of making health care facilities safer and improving the patient experience.Source: https://www.northwell.edu/last_img read more

Researchers highlight the need for pediatricians to discuss firearm safety

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 28 2019Paradoxically, as overall firearm ownership decreased in U.S. households with young children from 1976 to 2016, the proportion of these families who owned handguns increased. This shift in firearm preferences over decades from mostly rifles to mostly handguns coincided with increasing firearm-mortality rates in young children, researchers report Jan. 28, 2019, in Pediatrics.”Almost 5 million children live in homes where at least one firearm is stored loaded and unlocked,” Kavita Parikh, M.D., a pediatric hospitalist at Children’s National Health System, and co-authors write in an invited commentary. “This study is a loud and compelling call to action for all pediatricians to start open discussions around firearm ownership with all families and share data on the significant risks associated with unsafe storage. It is an even louder call to firearm manufacturers to step up and innovate, test and design smart handguns, inoperable by young children, to prevent unintentional injury,” Dr. Parikh and colleagues continue.Related StoriesNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenResearch team receives federal grant to study obesity in children with spina bifidaRevolutionary gene replacement surgery restores vision in patients with retinal degenerationThe Children’s commentators point to the “extremely dangerous” combination of “the small curious hands of a young child” and “the easily accessible and operable, loaded handgun” and suggest that pediatricians who counsel families about safely storing weapons tailor messaging to the weapon type and the family’s reason for owning a firearm.They also advocate for childproofing firearms stored in the home – through free or discounted locks, storing weapons separately from ammunition, and using personalized technology that limits the firearm’s potential to be used by children accidentally. According to a retrospective, cross-sectional study led by Children’s researchers, younger children are more likely to be shot by accident.”The development of effective safety controls on firearms is not only attainable but could be the next big step towards reducing mortality, especially among our youngest. We as a society should be advocating for continued research to ‘childproof’ firearms so that if families choose to have firearms in the home, the safety of their children is not compromised,” Dr. Parikh and co-authors write. Source:https://childrensnational.org/last_img read more